Starting A Rock Band: 4 Tips To Help You Start A Band

April 19th, 2013 by
Ex Soul Sanctuary Guitarist Ben Taylor

Putting together a band

How Do You Start A Rock Band?

You have talent for music, you love playing, and now you want to take that extra step and create a band but don’t know where to start. Many musicians starting out don’t know where to begin on their journey towards musical success. Some musicians want to be a part of a band whereas some want to play solo; however both involve a different style of music.

Putting together a band can be difficult; especially if you don’t know many people that want to be a part of one, however doing so isn’t impossible. Whether you are looking to just start a garage band or even take it a step further and start to perform at venues, consider some of the tips below.

Friends and Family

There may be a family member or friend that enjoys playing a specific instrument and wants to find band mates to play with. If you haven’t already asked the people you know whether they are willing to put together a band and play together, then do so! Consider asking your friends if they know of anyone that is willing to join in.

Social Media

Social media doesn’t just give you the ability to connect with people you know, but also people you don’t know. Websites such as Twitter give you the ability to include hashtags in your tweets so others who search that keyword can see your tweet. Soundcloud is another great way to connect with other musicians.

Make sure you post on your personal social media accounts stating you are on the lookout and want to start a band. Be sure to stay consistent on these sites.

Networking

Find events you can go to where you are able to connect and network with others that are interested in music. Don’t be shy to approach someone. In fact, taking a friend or two with you can be extremely beneficial as to who you can potentially meet.

Of course, it isn’t usual to find a band mate overnight, so give it some time to get to know the people you meet. Check out their interests and get to know their take on music and this will help you decide if they qualify as a potential band member.

Practice, Practice and Practice

Once you have found your band mates, make sure you practice, practice, and practice. Even if you set up a band just for pleasurable garage play, the better you all play together the more enjoyable your sessions will be.

 Remember that everything takes time, and putting together a band for a pleasure to the ears session or even potentially playing at venues is not easy.

About The Author:

Robert is a professional musician and songwriter. He has written his own guitar tutorial that is easy for children to learn. In his spare he enjoys hiking, enjoying the outdoors and going to jazz clubs.

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What Things Are You Certain To See At A Music Festival?

April 15th, 2013 by
Crowd at a music festival

What can you expect at a Music Festival?

For music lovers, there is nothing better during the summer months than heading to a daylong or weekend festival to see some of the biggest acts in the world.  While each festival is different, there are a number of similarities that they all share, things that you are guaranteed to see at each one that will give you memories for years to come, be they good or bad.

What are they?

Mud

Mud is perhaps more synonymous with festivals than even the music itself. Even if it is baking hot and the sun shines for two or three days, there is still the chance that you will end up covered in mud.

This element of festivals puts many people off going to them. It is also why those who attend such events get labelled as ‘hippies’ and other terms that are seen as derogatory, especially when you add in the urban legends about not washing for days at a time and wearing the same clothes from start to finish.

Fireworks Displays

If you attend a music festival this summer and don’t see a fireworks display, then you should be making sure you ask for your money back.

After all, you have stood on your feet for probably more than 12 hours, haven’t had a drink, and perhaps been thrown from pillar to post in the middle of the crowd, so even if you have seen a band you have been waiting to see for years, a fireworks display should be the least you expect.

Thankfully, most festival organisers want to end their events ‘with a bang,’ and you will often find that a spectacular fireworks demonstration follows the conclusion of a headline set.

Things Being Thrown

We hope that we do not have to expand on what the ‘things’ are, as if you have ever been to a festival you will probably already know what we’re alluding to.

The trouble with this is that you don’t see it coming most of the time, or that the people doing it cannot be ejected as there aren’t security guards standing at every interval in a crowd of tens of thousands.

Unfortunately, if it does happen, you just need to grin and bear it.

Horrible Facilities

Along with the mud, dirty toilet facilities are enough to put most people off, even if their favourite bands are playing at a particular festival.

Whether it is the shared facilities element or the fact that they just aren’t welcoming or well maintained at all, many people simply want to avoid them.

Music to Remember

It’d be unfair to talk about a festival and mention the mud, fireworks, and other elements without actually talking about the music.

Whether it is the band you always wanted to see live or a group you never heard of, you are certain to listen to and see performances that you will remember for a long time to come.

Deciding to Go

If the facilities are putting you off, just book a hotel near to the site, and you’ll have access to everything you need. Don’t let a little mud stop you from discovering the festival experience, as it is one almost unrivalled anywhere else in the world.

About The Author:

Stuart is an online content writer with a huge passion for music and festivals, so much so that after returning from various events he often seeks out fireworks for sale from an online retailer and tries to recreate his favourite festivals in his own garden.

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Five Ways To Make The Most Of Recording Studio Time

April 10th, 2013 by
Peak Meter

5 Ways To Make The Most Of Recording Studio Time

The following blog is by a special Guest Author and presented in collaboration with www.selectrecordingstudios.co.uk

Make The Most Of Recording Studio Time

Whether you’re about to record an album or making a demo that you can shop around to record companies, studio time is a significant investment – so it pays to do everything you can to get the most bang for your buck. It’s essential to carefully plan and organise your time so you don’t waste a minute and end up with nothing to show for a day’s recording. Follow these simple steps to get everything you can out of time in the recording studio and end up with results you love.

1. Get Studio Versions of Songs Prepared

There’s a huge difference between live performance and performing in a studio so make sure you’ve checked your arrangements and worked out how best to record your song. Creating succinct, tight versions of your song will afford you the best results and save time in the studio too. If you’re trying to promote your band, then a sloppy demo is not the best way to go about it. The more slick and professional your demo is the more likely you are to be picked up.

2. Set Studio Time Goals

You’ll have a set amount of hours in the studio but whether it’s a day or a fortnight, treat it like a job and carefully map out your time. This is especially important if you need to accommodate other musicians flexibly. Once you’re in the studio time will fly so it’s much more effective to have a concrete timetable than a loose plan.

Choose one or two tracks to work on in a day and don’t be tempted to squeeze more in if you don’t have any longer. It’s much better to complete two songs perfectly than end up with a bunch of half finished recordings. A three minute song could take three hours to record so it’s unlikely that you’ll finish a whole album in a day. However, there’s always the chance that you’ll get things done more quickly than you expected so make contingencies for any time you have left by preparing a couple of extra tracks just in case.

If you’re working with a band then make sure they’re aware of your plans and understand what your expectations of them are. That way there’s far less likely to be confusion over which songs to learn or which instruments to bring.

3. Opt for Professional Mastering

Mixing is usually done by engineers within a recording studio but mastering is an entirely different process. If you eliminate mastering from the studio time you have it can allow you to fit in more. You can get your recordings mastered at a later date but make sure you enlist someone with the skills and experience you need. Although professional mastering is a separate investment, you’ll end up with better results than you will if you try to do everything at once.

4. Eat and Drink

It may sound silly but when you’re caught up in the moment everything else goes out of the window, but forgetting to eat and drink certainly won’t help your performance. If you want to maintain your energy levels then choose healthy foods that release energy slowly like wholemeal bread, porridge and brown rice. Avoid high fat, high sugar foods as they will give you a burst of energy followed by a slump. Keep hydrated with plenty of water and if you want to stay on your toes avoid drinking alcohol.

5. Pick the Right Studio

Embarking on your first recording studio session can be daunting so look for a studio that caters for your needs. Most studios accommodate amateurs and professionals but will incorporate differing levels of service. A good studio will have friendly, helpful, well-qualified staff who will be able to talk you through the recording process and put you at ease. They’ll also be able to help you find ways to improve your performance and offer advice on recording techniques.

You’ll find useful information on the majority of recording studio websites about the kind of work they do and some will even allow you to listen in to recent recordings so you can get a feel for the type of result you can expect.

Bonus Tip

If you’re feeling a little intimidated by the idea of a recording studio session then pay a visit to the studio before it takes place. Staff there should be happy to give you a tour and let you familiarise yourself with the surroundings and what will happen on the day, which will help you to feel more at ease when you finally come to record.

So if you’re set to become the next big thing make sure you start off on the right foot and follow these tips to ensure that your recording studio session is a rousing success.

About the Author:

I’m a fifty something technical director with a passion for the food industry and blogging.

I’m happily married with two grown up daughters.

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